Escambia (AO-80) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Kennebago (AO-81)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard on 16 December 1943 soon after completion.
The first nine ships of this class had a smokestack that was noticeably thinner than those of the Sun-built T2 tankers.

Photo No. 19-N-57871
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Escambia (AO-80)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard circa October-December 1943.
This undated view shows the ship with her initial armament that included only two 40mm twin mounts.

Photo No. 19-N-63574
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Soubarissen (AO-93)

Near the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, Hunters Point, on 20 January 1945.
The last four ships of this class, plus the two converted to distilling ships (AW 3-4), had funnels that were larger than those in the first batch. They resembled the stacks of the Sun-built T2 tankers.

Photo No. 19-N-91483
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Soubarissen (AO-93)

Near the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, Hunters Point, on 20 January 1945.

Photo No. 19-N-91485
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Cahaba (AO-82)

Refueling USS Iowa (BB-61) and an Essex class carrier (either Ticonderoga, Randolph, or Shangri-La) in the Pacific in 1945.
The large view presented here is oversized and includes the full original image.

Photo No. 80-G-K-6112
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Kennebago (AO-81)

At San Francisco in March 1946 enroute from the Western Pacific to Boston for decommissioning.

Photo No. NH 78568
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Ponaganset (AO-86)

At a pier of the General Ship and Iron Works, Boston, Mass., on 9 December 1947 shortly after breaking in half during reactivation.
Ponaganset was one of 24 tankers that the Navy reacquired in late 1947 to bring fuel oil for the fleet from the Persian Gulf. Fractures like this had been a problem since late 1942 in war-built welded ships, particularly in Liberty ships and T-2 tankers. Ponaganset was replaced in the Navy's reactivation plan by Mission Santa Ana (AO-137).

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe

 
USNT Escambia (AO-80)

Operating as a civilian-manned U.S. Naval Tanker in 1948 or 1949.

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe

 
USNS Kennebago (T-AO-81)

Operating as a civilian-manned MSTS tanker during the 1950s.
Unlike Escambia, which received the same armement in early 1941, this ship has enclosed mounts both forward and aft. The vertical splinter protection has also been omitted from all four 5" gun positions.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USNS Mascoma (T-AO-83)

Operating as a civilian-manned MSTS tanker during the 1950s.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USNS Anacostia (T-AO-94)

Operating as a civilian-manned MSTS tanker during the 1950s.
Note the larger smokestack fitted to the second batch of ships in this class.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command