Abarenda (IX-131) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

S.S. Acme (American tanker, 1916)

Probably photographed soon after completion.
This ship became USS Abarenda (IX-131) in 1944.

Photo No. None
Source: Naval History and Heritage Command (Ships Histories files)

 
S.S. Acme (American tanker, 1916)

Probably photographed soon after completion.
This ship became USS Abarenda (IX-131) in 1944.

Photo No. NH 104164
Source: Naval History and Heritage Command

 
S.S. Acme (American tanker, 1916)

Under tow after being torpedoed in the stern on 17 March 1942 by U-124 off North Carolina.
She was abandoned by her crew but was later towed by Navy and Coast Guard vessels to Lynnhaven Roads, Virginia, and then to Newport News for repairs. This ship became USS Abarenda (IX-131) in 1944.

Photo No. 80-G-177204
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
S.S. Acme (American tanker, 1916)

Photographed by the U.S. Coast Guard at anchor on 19 August 1943.
This ship became USS Abarenda (IX-131) in 1944.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
S.S. Frank G. Drum (American tanker, 1921)

On trials near Alameda, California, on 26 March 1921.
This ship became USS Stonewall (IX-185) in 1944.

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe

 
S.S. Moskva (Soviet tanker, 1918)

Formerly the American tanker W. M. Irish, this ship was transferred under Lend Lease to the Soviet Union in 1943 and returned in 1944.
She became USS Nausett (IX-190) in 1945.

Photo No. NH 89952
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
S.S. Liebre (American tanker, 1921)

This ship was built by a smaller shipyard near the Bethlehem Steel yards at Alameda and San Francisco, California, apparently to the same plans used by Bethlehem.
She became USS Meredosia (IX-193) in 1945.

Photo No. None
Source: The Steamship Historical Society of America (Alex. Shaw collection)

 
S.S. Utacarbon (American tanker, 1920)

Probably photographed on trials circa March 1920.
This ship became USS Yucca (IX-214) in 1945.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-32-S

 
S.S. Durango (American tanker, 1920)

At Pearl Harbor in May 1942.
This view shows the early wartime appearance of some of the ships of this type, including Utacarbon above, that had smaller smokestacks than some of their sisters. Durango was not acquired by the Navy.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-32-S